Artist on View

Peter Konsterlie, who directs the Shelfhaudt Gallery at the Arnold Bernhard Center and is an adjunct professor at the Shintaro Akatsu School of Design, has been busy showing his own works. He participated in a “Meet the Artists” event at the Spring Art Exhibition in Red Hook, Brooklyn, in May. In June, he was among several artists in a 2000-square-foot pop-up gallery in downtown Norwalk.

Read More

Rewarding Good Works

As UB’s VISTA coordinator, Jennifer Turner works hard to provide students with opportunities to get involved in the community. Most notably, she was interviewed by national media after refereeing a SNAP food challenge to see if Newark Mayor Cory Booker could dine on only $35 a week. The contest was held the same week as the SNAP challenge Turner planned for UB students. Her work has not gone unnoticed. In April, Turner received a Connecticut...

Read More

To France on a Fulbright!

Thomas J. Ward, dean of the College of Public and International Affairs, was selected by the J. William Fulbright Scholarship Board to participate in an International Education Administrators (IEA) seminar that will be held in France in the fall of 2013. Ward, who studied at the University of Paris, said that he is “very grateful” to have been chosen for the program. In his proposal, Ward outlined his interest in understanding how...

Read More

New Yorker Nutrition

Load up on veggies, fruit, and lean protein. Ditch sugar, fat, and white bread. When it comes to dietary advice, we’ve heard it all before. But Human Nutrition Institute professor Barry S. Kendler’s take on healthy eating took a far more creative and entertaining turn when was invited to give advice at the Fairfield Public libraries. During his lecture, “New Yorker Nutrition,” Kendler made serious points about smart eating by using...

Read More

Blowing in the Wind

Call it playing for your supper on overdrive: In May, music professor and saxophonist Bill Harris blew into Tokyo to perform two nights with Sam Moore (from the R&B duo Sam & Dave) before jetting back to the States. “It was so short I didn’t get jet lag,” says an indefatigable Harris. In fact, touring is nothing new for Harris. When he’s not on the road (sax, clarinet, or flute in hand) Harris teaches woodwinds classes at UB—or...

Read More

Faculty Lines: Emergency Response

Hurricane Sandy. The Boston Marathon. 9/11. When disasters strike, the impulse to help is laudable and understandable. Yet all too often, an influx of volunteers undermines relief efforts, says Professor Martha Petersen, who is associate director of the Physician Assistant Institute. “After Katrina, there was a mess of people rushing in to volunteer. But having PAs, doctors, and EMTs just showing up complicated things,” explains Petersen....

Read More

Heavenly Praise

Jani Macari Pallis has been named Campus Director of the Year by the Connecticut Space Grant Consortium (CSGC) because she has significantly increased the number of UB students and faculty working on applied aerospace projects that support NASA initiatives. Pallis, an associate professor of mechanical engineering, is the CSGC’s campus director at UB. In that role, she is responsible for promoting the consortium to UB faculty and students, and...

Read More

Summer Roll!

Summer Roll!

Larry Orman decided to celebrate summer by making a sushi feast for his colleagues at UB’s Communications Department, which is responsible for designing and producing everything from faculty business cards to event posters, admissions and alumni mailings, and more. Orman is executive director of the department. “I figured it’s a good time of year to do it, when things are a little quieter,” says Orman, who spent more than five hours...

Read More

Talking about Sports

Talking about Sports

Some guys have to wait until quitting time to get their sports fix. Not Chuck Sadowski, UB’s tireless sports information director. At the height of sports season, Sadowski fields media requests for the Athletics Department like Henrik Lundqvist facing a break-away without a defenseman in sight. For that, Sadowski was presented with a 25-year Award plaque from the College Sports Information Directors of America. “I really can’t see myself...

Read More

Woman on the Go

Woman on the Go

As Coordinator for the Division of Health Sciences, Lena Minervino keeps things running like clockwork for not one, but five schools: the Human Nutrition Institute, Fones School of Dental Hygiene, the Colleges of Naturopathic Medicine and Chiropractic, and the Physician Assistant Institute. “It gets a little crazy at times,” Minervino admits. “But I love working with professionals who are so committed to health and wellness.” She can...

Read More

Pleasure Beach Redux

Pleasure Beach Redux

In 1996, a fire destroyed the bridge connecting Bridgeport to Pleasure Beach, the now-defunct amusement park. Crowds drifted, the last cottages on the land were bulldozed, and in their stead came wildlife, flora, and fauna. “It features the grand architectural ruins that are so emblematic of Bridgeport, but shows what happens when nature reclaims land,” says Emily Larned, chair of the graphic design program and assistant professor at...

Read More

Lobbying for Science

Lobbying for Science

When the laser was invented in 1960 it was described as a “solution seeking a problem” or a “physicist’s plaything,” because no application had been identified for it, says mathematics professor David Kraft. Yet today, lasers are used to our scan groceries, repair tissue in the human body, play music and movies, and much, much more. In fact, says Kraft, “the economic impact of the laser is estimated at one-third to one-half of the...

Read More

Painful Conclusions

Painful Conclusions

An estimated 5.8 million Americans suffer from the chronic pain of fibromyalgia, and many are directed to get certain kinds of exercise and medications, eschew alcohol and caffeine, and reduce stress. Yet it’s often not effective enough. That’s because there’s a large disconnect between fibromyalgiatreatment plans prescribed by many physicians and current scientific research on the disorder, says Dr. David M. Brady, who is vice provost for...

Read More

Picking up the Baton for Music Education

Picking up the Baton for Music Education

Frank Martignetti, who is an adjunct professor of music and UB’s choral director, has been busy presenting at conferences to help teachers in urban school districts launch and enhance music programs. “So often, urban schools are looked upon as deficient, and they certainly face many challenges. Yet elements in successful urban music programs, such as strong student engagement, innovative general music courses, sophisticated use of...

Read More

Sharing Interests, Bridging Boundaries

Sharing Interests, Bridging Boundaries

What could a naturopathic physician, graphic designer, and literature professor have in common? They might all work at the same institution, but their paths cross in a more unique way. Independently of the other, they have each researched some aspect of Cherokee heritage. Naturopathic physician Jody E. Noé has been studying the oral medicinal tradition of the Keetoowah Western Cherokee while graphic design professor Gary Munch was busy...

Read More

Transcendentalism for Today

Transcendentalism for Today

Before Occupy Wall Street, there was New England Transcendentalism, whose well-educated adherents (Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Margaret Fuller among them) believed that social change should be actuated by individuals’ personal spiritual relationships with God (or as Emerson wrote: “A nation of men will for the first time exist, because each believes himself inspired by the Divine Soul which also inspires all men”). To...

Read More

Behind the Seams

Behind the Seams

Professor Janet Albert visited the NYC markets with her costume history class as one of many trips to New York she takes with her students. “The trips to New York are an integral part of the program’s career-oriented curriculum, which combines classroom teaching with an exposure to the fashion industry and integration with top designers,” Albert explains. A curator at the Costume Museum guided Albert’s students through the exhibition...

Read More

The Envelope, Please…

The Envelope, Please…

Social media whiz and mass communications professor Susan Katz recently won two American Association of Political Consultants coveted Pollie Awards. The prizes, which have been called “the Oscars of political advertising,” recognize professionals in the communications industry who’ve demonstrated superlative work. Katz won a silver for the “Promises, Promises” radio campaign she created for former Bridgeport mayoral challenger...

Read More